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28 September: Referencing and micro-teaching prep.

29 September 2010

Here is the podcast of a slightly earlier version of the presentation:

The links I posted for assistance with referencing were to:

And for a basic guide look in the Handbook (p 91 ff.) or similar material slightly up-dated at http://www.doceo.co.uk/academic/assignment_presentation.htm#Referencing
When talking about different editions in different countries, I mentioned the case of  Crawford (2010); the US edition of his book is called Shopclass as Soulcraft. In any event both Peter H and I can heartily recommend it.
In the second half we talked about the microteaching exercise; the briefing sheet can be found here. (.pdf format; Acrobat Reader required.)
I asked you “What aspects of your teaching would you find it most useful to have feedback on?” as a first step to devising an observation record sheet for the exercise. I will devise a draft observation form based on your ideas and we can try it out next week.
So far the micro-teaching schedule is looking like this: (the numbers refer to the first or second half of the session.)
5 October (2) Paul Cross
12 October (1) Jackie Palmer (2) Paul Griffiths
19 October (1) Jackie Saunders (2) Natalie Cooper
2 November (1) Emily Burke (2) Rashid Rehman
9 November (1) Cathy Tang (2) Alex Robinson
16 November (1) Dionne Jackson (2) Caroline Duffy
23 November (1) Merielle James
I promised that I’d post a link to one form of session plan, for those of you going early before you’ve had a chance to go over such a plan with Peter H. Here is a very basic example of the body of one. The heading content would be (very broadly) similar to that for a scheme of work.
I left you with the Professional Practice Learning Contract, which introduces the more personalised learning aspect of the course: we shall look at that in the first half of next week. Do remember to let Peter know about your mentor, and start thinking about setting up your first observation.

Reference
Crawford M (2010) The Case for Working with Your Hands: or Why Office Work is Bad for Us and Fixing Things Feels Good. London; Viking.
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